Presidents on My Mind

In Georgia with Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Jimmy Carter

A couple of wonderful presidents were on our route as we traveled through Georgia dodging the frozen north in January.

We stopped at Jimmy Carter’s tiny hometown, Plains, Georgia, with its museum, home place, and current home.

Jimmy Carter's birthplace, a modest farmhouse in Plains, Georgia
Jimmy Carter’s birthplace, a modest farmhouse.
At the school turned museum about Jimmy Carter, there's an unattended replica of Jimmy Carter's Oval Office.
At the school turned museum for Jimmy Carter, there’s an unattended replica of President Carter’s Oval Office. It felt good to sit there, especially with the curtains matching my scarf.
Billy Carter's gas station along the main street in the tiny town of Plains, Georgia
Billy Carter’s gas station along the main street in Plains. Billy was Jimmy Carter’s rogue brother.

Near the state park we visited Warm Springs where Franklin Delano Roosevelt had a modest home built. When he became president, it was called the Little White House and is now a state historic site. We stood by the chair where the president suffered a stroke and by his single bed in his small bedroom where he died a few hours later, April 11, 1945.

This is the chair where FDR was sitting, posing for a portrait, when he collapsed. He never regained consciousness and died a few hours later.
This is where FDR was sitting, posing for a portrait, when he collapsed. He never regained consciousness and died a few hours later.
At the Little White House in Warm Springs, Georgia, FDR died in 1945. Artist Elizabeth Shoumatoff was painting his portrait when he collapsed. The unfinished watercolor is exhibited in the home, which is open to the public.
Artist Elizabeth Shoumatoff was painting FDR’s portrait when he collapsed. The unfinished watercolor is exhibited in the home.

We spent four days at FD Roosevelt State Park in a cabin built by the CCC–the Civilian Conservation Corps–in the 1930s. It was a National Recovery Act program invented by Roosevelt after he was elected during the nation’s worst economic depression. The program employed an army of out-of-work young men to build wonderful stone structures on public lands throughout our nation. Many of the buildings, picnic shelters, stone-lined paths, and roads are still striking features across the country today.

We have seen the CCC’s handiwork from the Blue Ridge Parkway to Saguaro National Park to Watoga State Park in West Virginia. The program was a model of public works projects.

In front of the visitor's center at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt State Park in Georgia is a tribute to the thousands of men who found jobs in the National Recovery Act program. In this public works project, they built stone structures in parks all over the country including this visitor's center.
In front of the visitor’s center at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt State Park in Georgia is a tribute to the thousands of men who found jobs in the CCC. In this public works project, they built stone structures in parks all over the country including this visitor’s center.
We stayed in one of the beautiful stone cabins built by the CCC along a ridgeline in the hills of Western Georgia.
In our CCC cabin at FD Roosevelt ParkI admired the stonework of the fireplace--and built a roaring fire every night. Catnip for a city kitty.
In our CCC cabin at FDR Park, I admired the stonework of the fireplace–and built a roaring fire every night. Catnip for a city kiddie.

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4 thoughts on “Presidents on My Mind

  1. I like the gas station best. I’m ready to pull up in my fantasy ’52 Dodge pickup and fill up with some pretend gas. Oh— and buy an imaginary bag of peanuts inside, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pat, I just love your photos! How did you know about renting one of those CCC-built cabins? We have actually been up to Plains and also Americus, where Habitat for Humanity has its HQ. really liked that area, and there is a bit of progressive activism there (the county went for Hillary). Too bad we couldn’t have run into each other at the great old hotel in americus. I don’t forget it was you who introduced to us the idea of Wakulla Springs and its faintly seedy hotel. Nice to see you in action. Best to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. How great to hear from you. To find the CCC cabins, I spend way too much time on the reservation sites for state and national parks. You can click on each cabin or campsite and see pictures and details about it. There’s also a little map so you can sometimes figure out the site at the end of a loop or nearest the water. Then i check TripAdvisor to see if anyone has recommendations or information. Sometimes also there are traveler blogs and websites with descriptions of sites. Over-researching lovely places during nasty cold days in the city is just fun.

    We thought about going to Wakulla Springs again, but it was full. But I’m glad because it gave us more days at FDR State Park that we liked so much. We didn’t think to stop in Americus. Sounds like it would have been grand.

    Like

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